Batter my Heart – God is not Clinical or Safe

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Let’s take a real biblical look at batter my heart.

In the church we have made God very clinical, sterile, insipid, and neutered. And our God is anything but. His passionate pursuit of us is often offensive, rude, and appears harsh. The level of His passion is the level of His pursuit. And everything that stands in the way of His pursuit is leveled and annihilated, including our good Christianity. Does this seem too severe a view of God? Let’s look at someone who lived with a heart for God to see if God battered it.

David: Batter My Heart

David Batter My Heart
David was a man after God’s own heart. Did God batter his heart? Yes, for sure! Here’s one huge way. To this man whose heart was wide open and full of passion, God occasionally showed Himself as harsh and rude. How, you might ask? Looking at his recorded story, you can see it.

First David’s own father and brothers all but rejected him. He wasn’t even worth seeing. He was more of a slave than a son. Do you think this wounded a little boy with a wide-open heart? They didn’t even think of him when Samuel came to select a king. “That’s just David. No, he couldn’t be king! ” And this was of God’s design, even though it would’ve wounded David greatly. A battering of his heart, but David was God’s man.

Then his next role model – and father figure – King Saul hounded and pursued him to kill him. Yes, thirteen times in all. And how did this fully passionate man of heart translate this? With agony! It killed him. All of those who were supposed to be seen as being roles of loving and fathering despised him. He bemoans this in the Psalms.

So Why Does God Batter My Heart

Why Does God Batter My Heart
Why? Why would God be so rude and harsh to a man with such a heart? Because God chose not to share David’s heart with any other. He would not see David call any man father but Himself. He battered David’s heart. He assaulted him in love. That love just didn’t look like our idea of love. It offends our modern sensibilities. But we experience this God of passion all the time. Remember, God’s love is as cruel as the grave, and as strong as death. The grave is a relentless, unforgiving force. The grave doesn’t apologize for swallowing its victim. It ruthlessly takes and thanklessly receives them. Death is an inevitable force that pursues us and eventually overtakes us. This is our God, too.

 

Comments:

Posted by Marsela
March 16, 2017 at 11:36 pm

The question becomes what if David was the very favorite of his father? What if his brothers treated him well, what if King Saul treated him with love and honored him? What if?
Having the heart he had, very passionate and fully opened, he would have fully given it away in return. And God knew what the young David didn’t know. It is God Himself who gave him that passionate heart.
You said it John, “God chose not to share his heart with any other”.
He has made us for Himself, period. Not for our parents, sibling, spouse, children, grandchildren and so on. No, for Himself! He created us for Himself, for His own pleasure.
And the next question is, would David have been more rewarded, had God allowed the “if” in his life?….

Reply
    Posted by John Enslow
    March 17, 2017 at 10:33 am

    All the “ifs” in this life! I am choosing to receive, accept and embrace all His choices in my life, rather than turning on myself and Him, in self-hatred or bitterness. His idea of my life is so beyond my limiting opinions of how it should be. Love you Marsela!

    Reply
      Posted by Paul
      March 17, 2017 at 6:07 pm

      Your response John, to Marsela’s wonderful comments says it all: His idea over our limiting opinions of how we think it should be! SELAH! Thank you for this series…so much food for the soul

      Reply
        Posted by John Enslow
        March 17, 2017 at 6:52 pm

        More to come my friend!!!

        Reply

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